White former Oklahoma cop who fatally shot his daughter’s black boyfriend convicted of manslaughter.

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — White former Oklahoma cop who fatally shot his daughter’s black boyfriend convicted of manslaughter.

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In Brazil, art exhibits latest flashpoints in cultural war

SAO PAULO (AP) — A couple of modern art exhibits and a play have become leading battlegrounds in a growing culture war in Brazil, a nation whose fame for barely there bikinis masks a rising trend of conservatism.

Protesters waved a Brazilian flag and shouted “No! No! Not our children!” to denounce an exhibit at Sao Paulo’s Museum of Modern Art in which visitors, including a child, were invited to touch a nude man. A bank-backed cultural center bowed to pressure and cancelled a Queermuseu exhibit exploring sexual diversity — only to have prosecutors denounce the incident as censorship. And a play portraying Jesus as a transgender woman led protesters to leap on the stage. A judge ordered one performance halted, but was overruled by another court.

The outside world has long assumed Brazil is as wild as its famously minimal swimwear and the exuberant, anything-goes Carnival celebrations. But many within the nation have always seen those as exceptions.

“In Brazil, we have a very ugly habit of sweeping everything under the carpet,” said Renata Carvalho, the actress who performs the one-woman show “The Gospel According to Jesus, Queen of Heaven.” ”This just sheds light on what people think. I think it’s excellent that the masks are falling.”

Brazil’s conservatism has been bolstered by the rise of evangelicals, a heavy-voting group that now accounts for one in five people — up from one in 20 a few decades ago in what is still the world’s most populous Catholic nation. Their fervor has been fed by a tidal wave of political corruption scandals that have led many Brazilians to believe the nation needs moral leadership.

Liberal activists have struggled to make Brazil a more open place for gays and women, and they gained some traction during the left-leaning Workers’ Party governments that led Latin America’s largest nation between 2003 and 2016. But conservatives are fighting back — aided in part by the fact that corruption scandals weakened the leftist movement.

Evangelical lawmakers in Congress are pushing to ban abortion in all cases. The Supreme Court has ruled that some public schools can teach religion. A judge has waved aside objections from the nation’s top psychologists in ruling that homosexuality can be addressed with so-called conversion therapy and treated as an illness, though that was knocked down by higher courts.

The fight over art is the most visible battleground of late.

Conservative groups have launched campaigns against two art exhibits, “La Bete” at the Sao Paulo museum and the Queermuseu exhibit in the southern city of Porto Alegre.

Critics accused “La Bete” of promoting pedophilia, and protests erupted when a video circulated online of a child touching the nude performance artist’s ankle and hand. On its Facebook page, the conservative Brazil Free Movement summed up many of the comments on social media in arguing that “left-wing artists” had gone too far and “were not prepared for the reality check confronting them.”

Others have attacked the Queermuseu exhibit, which contained some sexually explicit artwork. The Santander Cultural center bowed to the pressure last month and shut the exhibit early, but there have been rumors it will be reopened elsewhere.

Amid reports it might go to Rio de Janeiro’s Museum of Art, that city’s mayor, Marcelo Crivella, a retired Pentecostal bishop, denounced the exhibit for promoting both pedophilia and bestiality and said in a video posted on Facebook that his city didn’t want it. Sao Paulo’s mayor has chimed in with a video of his own denouncing both exhibits.

“Silencing uncomfortable discussions means not facing the conflicts inherent in society,” the museum shot back in a statement, although it has acquiesced to the mayor’s wish.

The state prosecutor’s office has asked that the Queermuseu exhibit be reopened, comparing its cancellation to Nazi Germany’s censorship of “degenerate art.”

There is a similar fight over the play in which Jesus is reimagined as a transgender woman who tells Biblical stories of tolerance.

“The Gospel According to Jesus, Queen of Heaven” has been performed more than 60 times during a tour of Brazil, but conservatives have called it offensive to Christians and petitioned courts to ban its performances.

“The performance of this horrific spectacle is equal to the persecution suffered by Christians in the first centuries when they were thrown to wild animals in the arenas of Rome as a form of entertainment,” said one such petition.

One judge granted an injunction, calling the play “disrespectful,” ”aggressive” and “in bad taste.” That decision has since been overturned on appeal and two other judges have rejected petitions for injunctions.

The contradictory judicial decisions reflect Brazil’s mixed history on questions of gay and trans rights, said Omar Encarnacion, a professor of political studies at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York.

Since becoming independent, Brazil has never had an anti-gay law on the books, and many, even inside the gay community, consider it a bastion of tolerance, said Encarnacion, who studies LGBT movements. Still, as with so many social issues in Brazil, there are striking contradictions. While Sao Paulo boasts the largest gay pride parade in the world, Brazil also has some of Latin America’s highest rates of violence against gay and transgender people.

The latest cultural clashes could help shape next year’s election.

A recent poll found that Jair Bolsonaro, a far-right congressman who once said “having a gay son means you didn’t spank him enough,” is running second among prospective presidential candidates. In recent weeks, Bolsonaro has frequently weighed in on the latest controversies.

Speaking of the “La Bete” exhibit, Bolsonaro said: “I only have one thing to say to these kinds of people: Scoundrels. Scoundrels a thousand times over.”

___

Sarah DiLorenzo on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sdilorenzo

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White former Oklahoma cop who fatally shot his daughter’s black boyfriend convicted of manslaughter.

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — White former Oklahoma cop who fatally shot his daughter’s black boyfriend convicted of manslaughter.

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In Brazil, art exhibits latest flashpoints in cultural war

SAO PAULO (AP) — A couple of modern art exhibits and a play have become leading battlegrounds in a growing culture war in Brazil, a nation whose fame for barely there bikinis masks a rising trend of conservatism.

Protesters waved a Brazilian flag and shouted “No! No! Not our children!” to denounce an exhibit at Sao Paulo’s Museum of Modern Art in which visitors, including a child, were invited to touch a nude man. A bank-backed cultural center bowed to pressure and cancelled a Queermuseu exhibit exploring sexual diversity — only to have prosecutors denounce the incident as censorship. And a play portraying Jesus as a transgender woman led protesters to leap on the stage. A judge ordered one performance halted, but was overruled by another court.

The outside world has long assumed Brazil is as wild as its famously minimal swimwear and the exuberant, anything-goes Carnival celebrations. But many within the nation have always seen those as exceptions.

“In Brazil, we have a very ugly habit of sweeping everything under the carpet,” said Renata Carvalho, the actress who performs the one-woman show “The Gospel According to Jesus, Queen of Heaven.” ”This just sheds light on what people think. I think it’s excellent that the masks are falling.”

Brazil’s conservatism has been bolstered by the rise of evangelicals, a heavy-voting group that now accounts for one in five people — up from one in 20 a few decades ago in what is still the world’s most populous Catholic nation. Their fervor has been fed by a tidal wave of political corruption scandals that have led many Brazilians to believe the nation needs moral leadership.

Liberal activists have struggled to make Brazil a more open place for gays and women, and they gained some traction during the left-leaning Workers’ Party governments that led Latin America’s largest nation between 2003 and 2016. But conservatives are fighting back — aided in part by the fact that corruption scandals weakened the leftist movement.

Evangelical lawmakers in Congress are pushing to ban abortion in all cases. The Supreme Court has ruled that some public schools can teach religion. A judge has waved aside objections from the nation’s top psychologists in ruling that homosexuality can be addressed with so-called conversion therapy and treated as an illness, though that was knocked down by higher courts.

The fight over art is the most visible battleground of late.

Conservative groups have launched campaigns against two art exhibits, “La Bete” at the Sao Paulo museum and the Queermuseu exhibit in the southern city of Porto Alegre.

Critics accused “La Bete” of promoting pedophilia, and protests erupted when a video circulated online of a child touching the nude performance artist’s ankle and hand. On its Facebook page, the conservative Brazil Free Movement summed up many of the comments on social media in arguing that “left-wing artists” had gone too far and “were not prepared for the reality check confronting them.”

Others have attacked the Queermuseu exhibit, which contained some sexually explicit artwork. The Santander Cultural center bowed to the pressure last month and shut the exhibit early, but there have been rumors it will be reopened elsewhere.

Amid reports it might go to Rio de Janeiro’s Museum of Art, that city’s mayor, Marcelo Crivella, a retired Pentecostal bishop, denounced the exhibit for promoting both pedophilia and bestiality and said in a video posted on Facebook that his city didn’t want it. Sao Paulo’s mayor has chimed in with a video of his own denouncing both exhibits.

“Silencing uncomfortable discussions means not facing the conflicts inherent in society,” the museum shot back in a statement, although it has acquiesced to the mayor’s wish.

The state prosecutor’s office has asked that the Queermuseu exhibit be reopened, comparing its cancellation to Nazi Germany’s censorship of “degenerate art.”

There is a similar fight over the play in which Jesus is reimagined as a transgender woman who tells Biblical stories of tolerance.

“The Gospel According to Jesus, Queen of Heaven” has been performed more than 60 times during a tour of Brazil, but conservatives have called it offensive to Christians and petitioned courts to ban its performances.

“The performance of this horrific spectacle is equal to the persecution suffered by Christians in the first centuries when they were thrown to wild animals in the arenas of Rome as a form of entertainment,” said one such petition.

One judge granted an injunction, calling the play “disrespectful,” ”aggressive” and “in bad taste.” That decision has since been overturned on appeal and two other judges have rejected petitions for injunctions.

The contradictory judicial decisions reflect Brazil’s mixed history on questions of gay and trans rights, said Omar Encarnacion, a professor of political studies at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York.

Since becoming independent, Brazil has never had an anti-gay law on the books, and many, even inside the gay community, consider it a bastion of tolerance, said Encarnacion, who studies LGBT movements. Still, as with so many social issues in Brazil, there are striking contradictions. While Sao Paulo boasts the largest gay pride parade in the world, Brazil also has some of Latin America’s highest rates of violence against gay and transgender people.

The latest cultural clashes could help shape next year’s election.

A recent poll found that Jair Bolsonaro, a far-right congressman who once said “having a gay son means you didn’t spank him enough,” is running second among prospective presidential candidates. In recent weeks, Bolsonaro has frequently weighed in on the latest controversies.

Speaking of the “La Bete” exhibit, Bolsonaro said: “I only have one thing to say to these kinds of people: Scoundrels. Scoundrels a thousand times over.”

___

Sarah DiLorenzo on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sdilorenzo

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In Brazil, art exhibits latest flashpoints in cultural war

SAO PAULO (AP) — A couple of modern art exhibits and a play have become leading battlegrounds in a growing culture war in Brazil, a nation whose fame for barely there bikinis masks a rising trend of conservatism.

Protesters waved a Brazilian flag and shouted “No! No! Not our children!” to denounce an exhibit at Sao Paulo’s Museum of Modern Art in which visitors, including a child, were invited to touch a nude man. A bank-backed cultural center bowed to pressure and cancelled a Queermuseu exhibit exploring sexual diversity — only to have prosecutors denounce the incident as censorship. And a play portraying Jesus as a transgender woman led protesters to leap on the stage. A judge ordered one performance halted, but was overruled by another court.

The outside world has long assumed Brazil is as wild as its famously minimal swimwear and the exuberant, anything-goes Carnival celebrations. But many within the nation have always seen those as exceptions.

“In Brazil, we have a very ugly habit of sweeping everything under the carpet,” said Renata Carvalho, the actress who performs the one-woman show “The Gospel According to Jesus, Queen of Heaven.” ”This just sheds light on what people think. I think it’s excellent that the masks are falling.”

Brazil’s conservatism has been bolstered by the rise of evangelicals, a heavy-voting group that now accounts for one in five people — up from one in 20 a few decades ago in what is still the world’s most populous Catholic nation. Their fervor has been fed by a tidal wave of political corruption scandals that have led many Brazilians to believe the nation needs moral leadership.

Liberal activists have struggled to make Brazil a more open place for gays and women, and they gained some traction during the left-leaning Workers’ Party governments that led Latin America’s largest nation between 2003 and 2016. But conservatives are fighting back — aided in part by the fact that corruption scandals weakened the leftist movement.

Evangelical lawmakers in Congress are pushing to ban abortion in all cases. The Supreme Court has ruled that some public schools can teach religion. A judge has waved aside objections from the nation’s top psychologists in ruling that homosexuality can be addressed with so-called conversion therapy and treated as an illness, though that was knocked down by higher courts.

The fight over art is the most visible battleground of late.

Conservative groups have launched campaigns against two art exhibits, “La Bete” at the Sao Paulo museum and the Queermuseu exhibit in the southern city of Porto Alegre.

Critics accused “La Bete” of promoting pedophilia, and protests erupted when a video circulated online of a child touching the nude performance artist’s ankle and hand. On its Facebook page, the conservative Brazil Free Movement summed up many of the comments on social media in arguing that “left-wing artists” had gone too far and “were not prepared for the reality check confronting them.”

Others have attacked the Queermuseu exhibit, which contained some sexually explicit artwork. The Santander Cultural center bowed to the pressure last month and shut the exhibit early, but there have been rumors it will be reopened elsewhere.

Amid reports it might go to Rio de Janeiro’s Museum of Art, that city’s mayor, Marcelo Crivella, a retired Pentecostal bishop, denounced the exhibit for promoting both pedophilia and bestiality and said in a video posted on Facebook that his city didn’t want it. Sao Paulo’s mayor has chimed in with a video of his own denouncing both exhibits.

“Silencing uncomfortable discussions means not facing the conflicts inherent in society,” the museum shot back in a statement, although it has acquiesced to the mayor’s wish.

The state prosecutor’s office has asked that the Queermuseu exhibit be reopened, comparing its cancellation to Nazi Germany’s censorship of “degenerate art.”

There is a similar fight over the play in which Jesus is reimagined as a transgender woman who tells Biblical stories of tolerance.

“The Gospel According to Jesus, Queen of Heaven” has been performed more than 60 times during a tour of Brazil, but conservatives have called it offensive to Christians and petitioned courts to ban its performances.

“The performance of this horrific spectacle is equal to the persecution suffered by Christians in the first centuries when they were thrown to wild animals in the arenas of Rome as a form of entertainment,” said one such petition.

One judge granted an injunction, calling the play “disrespectful,” ”aggressive” and “in bad taste.” That decision has since been overturned on appeal and two other judges have rejected petitions for injunctions.

The contradictory judicial decisions reflect Brazil’s mixed history on questions of gay and trans rights, said Omar Encarnacion, a professor of political studies at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York.

Since becoming independent, Brazil has never had an anti-gay law on the books, and many, even inside the gay community, consider it a bastion of tolerance, said Encarnacion, who studies LGBT movements. Still, as with so many social issues in Brazil, there are striking contradictions. While Sao Paulo boasts the largest gay pride parade in the world, Brazil also has some of Latin America’s highest rates of violence against gay and transgender people.

The latest cultural clashes could help shape next year’s election.

A recent poll found that Jair Bolsonaro, a far-right congressman who once said “having a gay son means you didn’t spank him enough,” is running second among prospective presidential candidates. In recent weeks, Bolsonaro has frequently weighed in on the latest controversies.

Speaking of the “La Bete” exhibit, Bolsonaro said: “I only have one thing to say to these kinds of people: Scoundrels. Scoundrels a thousand times over.”

___

Sarah DiLorenzo on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sdilorenzo

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Country stars honor shooting victims at CMT Artists show

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Singer Jason Aldean and other stars honored victims of a mass shooting at a country music festival in Las Vegas instead of accepting awards at the CMT Artists of the Year show Wednesday night.

The format of the show pivoted to focus on victims of the shooting, as well as those recovering from hurricanes and wildfires, with a night of somber tributes, inspirational anthems and voices lifted in harmony.

Aldean, who was on stage at the Route 91 Harvest Festival when the shooting occurred Oct. 1, stood side-by-side with the night’s other award winners, including Luke Bryan, Florida Georgia Line, Chris Stapleton and Keith Urban, to dedicate the night to music fans. The honorees did not accept awards or give speeches as usual, but some chose to perform or other musicians performed in their honor.

“We’ve been tested beyond our worst nightmare these past few months,” Aldean said during the live broadcast from Nashville, Tennessee. “Heartbroken doesn’t even begin to describe how some of us feel. But we have proven time and again in this country that we have the power to overcome anything that threatens our way of life, or our freedom. We dedicate this night to you and everyone who has experienced loss or tragedy in the last few months.”

Aldean closed out the night with a defiant and rollicking group performance of “I Won’t Back Down” by Tom Petty with Urban, Stapleton and Little Big Town.

Andra Day kicked off the awards show with her anthem “Rise Up,” in a beautiful harmony duet by Little Big Town. Then Lee Ann Womack, Danielle Bradbury and rapper Common joined them for a performance of “Stand Up For Something.”

“On this night when we usually celebrate a year of music, we also want to celebrate a year of incredible human spirit, the spirit we see in our fans every night,” Stapleton said.

“So in some small way we want to thank you for your resolve and perhaps lift your spirits for just a moment,” Urban said.

The names of the 58 victims from Las Vegas were listed during an in memoriam segment, along with the names of Petty, Gregg Allman, Glen Campbell, Don Williams and Troy Gentry.

Other performances including Bryan singing his single “Fast,” and Stapleton singing his song “Broken Halos,” a song that he’s dedicated to victims of the Vegas shooting.

The Backstreet Boys sang Florida Georgia Line’s emotional ballad “H.O.L.Y.” and Keith Urban performed a jazzy version of his song “Blue Ain’t Your Color.”

Phillip Phillips added some blues licks to Sam Hunt’s mega hit “Body Like a Back Road,” which was named song of the year by CMT.

Near the end of the night, Bryan took a moment to honor his friend Aldean.

“It could have been any one of us standing on that stage two weeks ago,” Bryan said. “It’s a nightmare that nobody should have to face. Jason has responded with dignity, care, respect and, some ways, defiance. And we all proud of him, especially me.”

___

Online: http://bit.ly/2zlxzTs

__ —

Follow Kristin Hall at Twitter.com/kmhall

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Country stars honor shooting victims at CMT Artists show

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Singer Jason Aldean and other stars honored victims of a mass shooting at a country music festival in Las Vegas instead of accepting awards at the CMT Artists of the Year show Wednesday night.

The format of the show pivoted to focus on victims of the shooting, as well as those recovering from hurricanes and wildfires, with a night of somber tributes, inspirational anthems and voices lifted in harmony.

Aldean, who was on stage at the Route 91 Harvest Festival when the shooting occurred Oct. 1, stood side-by-side with the night’s other award winners, including Luke Bryan, Florida Georgia Line, Chris Stapleton and Keith Urban, to dedicate the night to music fans. The honorees did not accept awards or give speeches as usual, but some chose to perform or other musicians performed in their honor.

“We’ve been tested beyond our worst nightmare these past few months,” Aldean said during the live broadcast from Nashville, Tennessee. “Heartbroken doesn’t even begin to describe how some of us feel. But we have proven time and again in this country that we have the power to overcome anything that threatens our way of life, or our freedom. We dedicate this night to you and everyone who has experienced loss or tragedy in the last few months.”

Aldean closed out the night with a defiant and rollicking group performance of “I Won’t Back Down” by Tom Petty with Urban, Stapleton and Little Big Town.

Andra Day kicked off the awards show with her anthem “Rise Up,” in a beautiful harmony duet by Little Big Town. Then Lee Ann Womack, Danielle Bradbury and rapper Common joined them for a performance of “Stand Up For Something.”

“On this night when we usually celebrate a year of music, we also want to celebrate a year of incredible human spirit, the spirit we see in our fans every night,” Stapleton said.

“So in some small way we want to thank you for your resolve and perhaps lift your spirits for just a moment,” Urban said.

The names of the 58 victims from Las Vegas were listed during an in memoriam segment, along with the names of Petty, Gregg Allman, Glen Campbell, Don Williams and Troy Gentry.

Other performances including Bryan singing his single “Fast,” and Stapleton singing his song “Broken Halos,” a song that he’s dedicated to victims of the Vegas shooting.

The Backstreet Boys sang Florida Georgia Line’s emotional ballad “H.O.L.Y.” and Keith Urban performed a jazzy version of his song “Blue Ain’t Your Color.”

Phillip Phillips added some blues licks to Sam Hunt’s mega hit “Body Like a Back Road,” which was named song of the year by CMT.

Near the end of the night, Bryan took a moment to honor his friend Aldean.

“It could have been any one of us standing on that stage two weeks ago,” Bryan said. “It’s a nightmare that nobody should have to face. Jason has responded with dignity, care, respect and, some ways, defiance. And we all proud of him, especially me.”

___

Online: http://bit.ly/2zlxzTs

__ —

Follow Kristin Hall at Twitter.com/kmhall

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Country stars honor shooting victims at CMT Artists show

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Singer Jason Aldean and other stars honored victims of a mass shooting at a country music festival in Las Vegas instead of accepting awards at the CMT Artists of the Year show Wednesday night.

The format of the show pivoted to focus on victims of the shooting, as well as those recovering from hurricanes and wildfires, with a night of somber tributes, inspirational anthems and voices lifted in harmony.

Aldean, who was on stage at the Route 91 Harvest Festival when the shooting occurred Oct. 1, stood side-by-side with the night’s other award winners, including Luke Bryan, Florida Georgia Line, Chris Stapleton and Keith Urban, to dedicate the night to music fans. The honorees did not accept awards or give speeches as usual, but some chose to perform or other musicians performed in their honor.

“We’ve been tested beyond our worst nightmare these past few months,” Aldean said during the live broadcast from Nashville, Tennessee. “Heartbroken doesn’t even begin to describe how some of us feel. But we have proven time and again in this country that we have the power to overcome anything that threatens our way of life, or our freedom. We dedicate this night to you and everyone who has experienced loss or tragedy in the last few months.”

Aldean closed out the night with a defiant and rollicking group performance of “I Won’t Back Down” by Tom Petty with Urban, Stapleton and Little Big Town.

Andra Day kicked off the awards show with her anthem “Rise Up,” in a beautiful harmony duet by Little Big Town. Then Lee Ann Womack, Danielle Bradbury and rapper Common joined them for a performance of “Stand Up For Something.”

“On this night when we usually celebrate a year of music, we also want to celebrate a year of incredible human spirit, the spirit we see in our fans every night,” Stapleton said.

“So in some small way we want to thank you for your resolve and perhaps lift your spirits for just a moment,” Urban said.

The names of the 58 victims from Las Vegas were listed during an in memoriam segment, along with the names of Petty, Gregg Allman, Glen Campbell, Don Williams and Troy Gentry.

Other performances including Bryan singing his single “Fast,” and Stapleton singing his song “Broken Halos,” a song that he’s dedicated to victims of the Vegas shooting.

The Backstreet Boys sang Florida Georgia Line’s emotional ballad “H.O.L.Y.” and Keith Urban performed a jazzy version of his song “Blue Ain’t Your Color.”

Phillip Phillips added some blues licks to Sam Hunt’s mega hit “Body Like a Back Road,” which was named song of the year by CMT.

Near the end of the night, Bryan took a moment to honor his friend Aldean.

“It could have been any one of us standing on that stage two weeks ago,” Bryan said. “It’s a nightmare that nobody should have to face. Jason has responded with dignity, care, respect and, some ways, defiance. And we all proud of him, especially me.”

___

Online: http://bit.ly/2zlxzTs

__ —

Follow Kristin Hall at Twitter.com/kmhall

⚡️ SUBSCRIBE!

Country stars honor shooting victims at CMT Artists show

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Singer Jason Aldean and other stars honored victims of a mass shooting at a country music festival in Las Vegas instead of accepting awards at the CMT Artists of the Year show Wednesday night.

The format of the show pivoted to focus on victims of the shooting, as well as those recovering from hurricanes and wildfires, with a night of somber tributes, inspirational anthems and voices lifted in harmony.

Aldean, who was on stage at the Route 91 Harvest Festival when the shooting occurred Oct. 1, stood side-by-side with the night’s other award winners, including Luke Bryan, Florida Georgia Line, Chris Stapleton and Keith Urban, to dedicate the night to music fans. The honorees did not accept awards or give speeches as usual, but some chose to perform or other musicians performed in their honor.

“We’ve been tested beyond our worst nightmare these past few months,” Aldean said during the live broadcast from Nashville, Tennessee. “Heartbroken doesn’t even begin to describe how some of us feel. But we have proven time and again in this country that we have the power to overcome anything that threatens our way of life, or our freedom. We dedicate this night to you and everyone who has experienced loss or tragedy in the last few months.”

Aldean closed out the night with a defiant and rollicking group performance of “I Won’t Back Down” by Tom Petty with Urban, Stapleton and Little Big Town.

Andra Day kicked off the awards show with her anthem “Rise Up,” in a beautiful harmony duet by Little Big Town. Then Lee Ann Womack, Danielle Bradbury and rapper Common joined them for a performance of “Stand Up For Something.”

“On this night when we usually celebrate a year of music, we also want to celebrate a year of incredible human spirit, the spirit we see in our fans every night,” Stapleton said.

“So in some small way we want to thank you for your resolve and perhaps lift your spirits for just a moment,” Urban said.

The names of the 58 victims from Las Vegas were listed during an in memoriam segment, along with the names of Petty, Gregg Allman, Glen Campbell, Don Williams and Troy Gentry.

Other performances including Bryan singing his single “Fast,” and Stapleton singing his song “Broken Halos,” a song that he’s dedicated to victims of the Vegas shooting.

The Backstreet Boys sang Florida Georgia Line’s emotional ballad “H.O.L.Y.” and Keith Urban performed a jazzy version of his song “Blue Ain’t Your Color.”

Phillip Phillips added some blues licks to Sam Hunt’s mega hit “Body Like a Back Road,” which was named song of the year by CMT.

Near the end of the night, Bryan took a moment to honor his friend Aldean.

“It could have been any one of us standing on that stage two weeks ago,” Bryan said. “It’s a nightmare that nobody should have to face. Jason has responded with dignity, care, respect and, some ways, defiance. And we all proud of him, especially me.”

___

Online: http://bit.ly/2zlxzTs

__ —

Follow Kristin Hall at Twitter.com/kmhall

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Southern Ballet Theatre to celebrate its 26th season with four performances of ‘The Nutcracker’ at Atlanta’s Infinite Energy Theater




<p>Southern Ballet Theatre presents ‘The Nutcracker’ at Infinite Energy Center in Duluth, Georgia</p>
<p>” align=”left” border=”0″ /><br />
						</a>Experience the magic of the classic ballet The Nutcracker by the Southern Ballet Theatre at Infinite Energy Center in Duluth, GA during the holidays. There will be four performances of the ballet on Nov. 18-19<br />
The holidays will get off to a festive start with this colorful ballet. The entire family…<a href=Keep reading…

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Turkey trots and Thanksgiving parades in Denver 2017



When the leaves and weather change in Denver, you know that Thanksgiving is around the corner.
This is the holiday where the family is everything. From the large spread on the dinner table to watching the big game or playing some touch football of your own, Thanksgiving is a magical time of the year…Keep reading…

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Turkey trots and Thanksgiving parades in Dallas and Ft. Worth 2017



Fall is a special time in the Dallas-Ft. Worth region, and Thanksgiving is the holiday that gives the season it’s magical luster.
Thanksgiving is a time for the family to come together and celebrate each other, mainly be eating all you can eat at the Thanksgiving table and cheer on the Dallas…Keep reading…

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Halloween parties and concerts in Birmingham 2017



Forget haunted houses and horror-movie marathons–this Halloween, the best place to be is at a concert, and as usual, Birmingham has plenty going on, from today’s biggest rock bands to country singers, with plenty happening at the BJCC. So, guys and ghouls, get your costume picked out, grab your…Keep reading…

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Photos: Shawn Colvin’s ‘A Few Small Repairs’ 20th Anniversary Tour


© Mary Andrews
Shawn Colvin has created her new tour based on her 20-year old certified platinum album, A Few Small Repairs. Celebrating older, more successful music seems to be a trend with many bands these days. Brian Wilson’s Pet Sounds Tour and Pearl Jam’s Binaural tour immediately come to mind. This tour is…Keep reading…

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