Harvard’s Theresa Lund “Here’s another Permit Patty trying to kick me off my own property” Black Mom

Alyson Laliberte: “Y’all here is another Permit Patty trying to kick me off my own property because she’s having a hard time getting her kids to take a nap at 3:30 in the afternoon on a Saturday. I’m outside enjoying the afternoon with my daughter when this woman came downstairs and asked me if I would move so her kids can nap. Mind you it’s mid day and we weren’t even being loud at all drawing with chalk. She followed me around and harassed me trying to get my information and apartment number as if she had a right to know. When I wouldn’t tell her she proceeded to ask me if I lived in the “affordable apartments” of the building for Cambridge residents or if I lived in one of the Harvard owned apartments (which is all the same building anyways). It was totally discriminating and racist of her.. or maybe it was because my daughter is biracial who knows. I have no idea who this woman is and the fact that she thinks she has some kind of authority over me is crazy! She wanted to know what apartment number I lived at so she can yell outside my window to see if I like it (real mature) as you hear her say in the video. This woman’s house is no bigger than mine even if she lives in one of the apartments that are owned by Harvard. Despite color, where I live, how much money I have she will be buried 6 feet under just like me… Why do people think they are literally better than others? Why does she think she has a right to make us move? If she really did not want to be disturbed she would own a one family house instead of deciding on moving in to a condominium with a bunch of neighbors. I’ve lived in this complex for 15 years. Not one other person complained about my daughter and I. I have no idea who this woman is but if someone knows her please tag her and share this if you agree!!!!”

Police arresting 14-year-old black teen outside of Philadelphia Zoo for selling water

Black youth’s arrest at Philadelphia Zoo sparks argument between zoo security staffers

The chaotic arrest of a black youth at the Philadelphia Zoo on Thursday was captured on video and posted to Facebook, where it has drawn more than 170,000 views and raised questions of how white people and police treat black people.

The video shows one of the zoo’s public safety officers, a black woman, shouting at another safety officer, a white woman who allegedly got Philadelphia police involved.

“This is what you did!” the black safety officer yelled at the white safety officer, as police held the youth face-down on the ground and tried to put him in handcuffs. “This is what you want. Is this what you want?”

“I only asked him to move!” the white safety officer shouted back. “I asked him to move.”

In the background, people could be heard saying, “What’d he do?” and “I’m sick of this.” Passing drivers stopped and honked.

Efforts to locate the youth, who was led away from the scene in handcuffs, or his family have been unsuccessful. It’s unclear how old he is and what charges, if any, he faces. Friday evening, a police spokesperson only said, “we are aware of the video and we are currently reviewing it.”

The video, which lasted about a minute and 30 seconds, doesn’t show what was happening before police approached the group.

Some people who commented on the video on Facebook said the youth and others regularly sold water at the plaza outside the zoo’s gates near 34th Street and Girard Avenue, where the arrest occurred. The woman who posted the video could not be reached Friday, but wrote that the youth were trying to raise money for their football team.

A zoo spokesperson, Dana Lombardo, said the group was not affiliated with “any legitimate local sports team” and was not selling water bottles at the time. She said zoo staff had asked the group to leave the plaza.

“There have been a number of incidents with this particular group, including soliciting money from zoo guests, throwing rocks at a zoo staff member just the previous day, and harassing another female public safety officer just before this incident occurred,” Lombardo said.

The group began to leave, she said, but made a “threatening remark” to one of the zoo’s safety officers, who then flagged down a Philadelphia police cruiser that was driving by.

The zoo did not detail what the alleged remark was or whether the arrested youth was behind it. The zoo also didn’t say whether the white safety officer in the video was the one who alerted police.

Man gets life without parole for gruesome torture-murder of girlfriend whose blood he drained in West Hollywood

Blake Leibel, a comic book artist and son of a Canadian real-estate tycoon, seen at left in an LA County Sheriff's Department booking mug, was sentenced Tuesday, June 26, 2018, to life in prison without the possibility of parole, for the murder of girlfriend Iana Kasian, seen at right in an image from Facebook. Leibel drained all of the blood in Kasian's body, mirroring the script of a graphic novel he co-wrote, prosecuters said.
Blake Leibel, a comic book artist and son of a Canadian real-estate tycoon, seen at left in an LA County Sheriff’s Department booking mug, was sentenced Tuesday, June 26, 2018, to life in prison without the possibility of parole, for the murder of girlfriend Iana Kasian, seen at right in an image from Facebook. Leibel drained all of the blood in Kasian’s body, mirroring the script of a graphic novel he co-wrote, prosecuters said.

LOS ANGELES — A West Hollywood man was sentenced Tuesday to life in prison without the possibility of parole for killing his live-in girlfriend, whose body was drained of all blood in a crime that a prosecutor said mirrored the script of a graphic novel the defendant co-wrote.

Judge Mark E. Windham cited the defendant’s “profound brutality” in handing down the life term.

Jurors at the Airport Branch Courthouse in Los Angeles deliberated for about 90 minutes last Wednesday before finding Blake Leibel, 37, guilty of first-degree murder, torture and aggravated mayhem for the May 2016 slaying of Iana Kasian, 30, in the condominium they shared. The panel also found true the special circumstance allegations of murder by torture and murder by mayhem.

The Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office had opted earlier not to seek the death penalty against Leibel.

“This case reads like a movie script,” Deputy District Attorney Tannaz Mokayef told jurors earlier this month, comparing the crime to a horror movie involving a “gruesome crime” that involved a “prolonged attack” in which Leibel’s girlfriend was “alive for the better part of the mutilation and mayhem.”

The prosecutor said Leibel “followed a script” from “Syndrome,” a book he co-wrote, saying it “mimics what happened to the victim” three weeks after she gave birth to their daughter.

The woman’s nude body, which was covered with a Mickey Mouse blanket that had been used earlier in their newborn’s nursery, was discovered on May 26, 2016, in the couple’s blood-spattered master bedroom after Kasian’s worried mother called authorities to report that she had not been able to reach her daughter, Mokayef said.

She showed jurors an illustration of a woman in Leibel’s book and urged them to compare it with the crime scene, saying it’s “almost exactly like what you have” in the case.

Leibel had barricaded himself inside the master bedroom and came out in boxer shorts after his accountant showed up, with sheriff’s deputies discovering “blood everywhere,” Mokayef said.

The woman appeared to have been washed thoroughly and was missing her scalp and the right side of her face, and pieces of flesh were found in the room, the prosecutor said, noting that part of the victim’s scalp that was turned inside out and an ear were subsequently discovered in a trash bin at the bottom of a chute outside the condominium.

The prosecutor said Leibel hadn’t factored in the persistence of his girlfriend’s mother, who initially notified Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputies about her daughter’s disappearance one day before the victim was found dead and then again in a 911 call in which she pleaded, “Help me,” the day her daughter’s body was discovered.

Olga Kasian, who had traveled from the Ukraine to help care for her infant grandchild, was called as the prosecution’s first witness.

Through a Russian interpreter, the victim’s mother said she had been helping to care for the baby, who was staying with her at a Los Angeles apartment, and that she never saw her daughter alive after the two went shopping May 23, 2016, to look for a baby stroller. She said she spoke to her daughter once the following afternoon and then never heard from her again.

Leibel has been described as a screenwriter and graphic novelist. His father, Lorne Leibel, is the founder of Toronto, Canada-based development company Canada Homes. His mother, Eleanor Leibel, is the daughter of Paul and Leona Chitel, founders of plastics manufacturer Alros Products Ltd.

Daily News Staff contributed to this report.

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Don’t dig deep holes in the sand at the beach – they can turn into traps

It’s a quiet danger that can turn a fun day at the beach into tragedy.

A seemingly harmless hole dug by a beach goer can be a deadly trap – a place where walls are quick to crumble, but powerful enough to suffocate a person buried inside.

A dramatic rescue late Friday in south Laguna highlights the dangers of getting trapped in a sand hole.  It’s a threat many who flock to the coastline are unaware of, but lifeguards hope knowledge of it will help save a life.

“It’s one of those dangers people don’t realize,” said OC Lifeguards Capt. Brad Herzog, the agency that oversees Aliso Beach. “People think it’s silly when we tell them not to dig a hole.

“A lot of people aren’t aware of the danger it poses.”

It may look harmless, but lifeguards say don't dig holes into the sand. File photo by Matt A. Brown/For the Register/SCNG
It may look harmless, but lifeguards say don’t dig holes into the sand. File photo by Matt A. Brown/For the Register/SCNG

Quick response

A young boy – about 6 or 7 years old – ran into a hole that was about 4-feet deep at Aliso Beach. The sand around him collapsed, burying him up to his nose.

“It sounded like his nose was just above the sand and he was able to breathe,” Herzog said. “Our lifeguards were able to dig around his mouth and get his airway open so they could dig him out.”

Orange County Fire Authority and Laguna Beach Fire Department showed up to help, carving a trench closer to the water line to divert the ocean so it wouldn’t flood the boy’s face.

The county beach –  like many others along the Southern California coastline – has an ordinance restricting holes deeper than two feet. The general rule is to never dig a hole deeper than your knees.

It was Aliso Beach’s first major sand burial incident, but one of several that has happened along the coast in previous years.

A frantic search

Last July, a 3-year-old boy went missing in West Newport near 40th street.

Moments before, he had been playing with other kids, digging a hole near shore.  The next second, he was buried alive, gone from sight.

Had it not been for an observant bystander who overheard the frantic mother and remembered the boy being near the hole minutes before, the toddler may not have survived.

On a hunch, Jesse Martin mobilized beach goers around him to start digging.

“After a couple big scoops I felt him under there,” Martin, who was visiting from Arizona, said in a previous interview with the Orange County Register.

The boy was white and blue when they pulled him from the sand.  Other beach goers helped by doing CPR and chest compressions until lifeguards arrived.

The boy was under the sand for about 3-4 minutes but survived the ordeal.

Lifeguards said he had been “tunneling” – digging one hole that connected to another hole – when it collapsed on top of him. Authorities believe the hole was about 3 feet deep.

Tunneling causes the most concern for lifeguards.

“You can have more sand collapsing onto you,” Herzog said.

Not just children

In 2011, Matt Mina spent three hours digging a deep, 6-foot hole at 54th street in Newport Beach when the sand collapsed around him and buried him.

No one knew if Mina – who was under for 10 minutes, then 20, then 30 – was alive or dead.  Mina, 17 at the time, remembers going in and out of consciousness from lack of oxygen as people dug frantically around his body.

He later recounted the story to rescuers, detailing how he felt the sand start to crumble at his feet, then his back as he was laying on his stomach digging. Then it completely covered him.

Mina, who was visiting from Virginia, screamed just before the sand engulfed his body. His cousin heard the yell.

Newport Beach,Costa Mesa and Huntington Beach firefighters,Newport Beach lifeguards pull teenager from 7 foot sand hole , after a 29 minute rescue operation,at 54th Street and West Ocean Front, August 3, 2011. Photo by RICHARD KOEHLER FOR THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER/SCNG
Newport Beach,Costa Mesa and Huntington Beach firefighters,Newport Beach lifeguards pull teenager from 7 foot sand hole , after a 29 minute rescue operation,at 54th Street and West Ocean Front, August 3, 2011. Photo by RICHARD KOEHLER FOR THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER/SCNG

Under the sand, he was able to move his head around to make a pocket for air. Then, he started losing consciousness.

“Once you’re six feet under, you can’t really hear anything atop,” he said. “I thought I was going to die.”

Lifeguards arrived – finding only a flat spot on sand that didn’t look different from the rest of the beach — but started digging for any sign of life. Soon, 30 people were digging frantically into the sand, including beach goers, firefighters and the Urban Search and Rescue group that specializes in burial retrievals.

They were able to pull Mina out, alive, without a scratch on him.

Nearly 25 years earlier, a 7-year-old died in the exact spot from being buried underground.

“It’s very unstable ground, and you can hurt yourself,” Mina said after the ordeal. “It’s kind of deadly.”

Former NBA players share thoughts on LeBron James’ latest free agency decision

The NBA Awards put a bow on the 2017-18 season.

Free agency begins at midnight on July 1st but that didn’t stop the media from asking former and current players for predictions about the future of the league during the red carpet event.

The hottest free agency topic involves LeBron James and his upcoming decision.

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“I have learned not to partake in this type of conversation about LeBron because I didn’t think he was going to leave the Cavs and he left,” Ben Wallace said. “I didn’t think he was going to leave Miami and he left so I am just going to follow along like everyone else.”

Wallace was a teammate of LeBron during the 2007-08 season in Cleveland.

“I don’t know (what LeBron’s decision will be),” said Latrell Sprewell, a former Golden State Warriors and New York Knicks player. “We will have to see what he does but he has every option open to him.”

In the past, it would be several days after the start of free agency that the basketball world would hear about Lebron’s decision.

ESPN’s Brian Windhorst mentioned on the “The Lowe Post” podcast that LeBron’s decision could come sooner than expected.

“Everybody will be on holiday on July 4,” Windhorst said. “It will be over by then.”

Ryan Hollins, a former player for the UCLA Bruins and Los Angeles Clippers, believes the former MVP will switch teams once again.

“My assumption is why not (leave Cleveland),” Hollins said. “I think he is coming to the Lakers. It just makes sense.”

While some players have LeBron penciled in to pack his belongings and leave Cleveland, Tracy McGrady, a former member of the Orlando Magic, doesn’t feel the same way as Hollins.

“I hope not,” McGrady said about the possibility of LeBron leaving the Cavaliers.

See this ‘Illusionists’ magician combine time travel and boy band dance moves in ‘The Magic of Adam Trent’

Adam Trent’s breakthrough came with “The Illusionists: Witness the Impossible” on Broadway.

As one of the variety show’s stars, the magician (then billed as the Futurist) charmed audiences with the perky disposition, boy band-style dance moves and technologically inspired tricks that he now brings to “The Magic of Adam Trent.”

Produced by the team behind the “The Illusionists,” the high-tech spectacular – coming to Hollywood Pantages Theatre on Friday, June 29 and Saturday, June 30 and then to Segerstrom Hall on Sunday, July 1 – is “a Broadway-scale production” for families.

Simon Painter, the creative producer of “The Magic of Adam Trent,” compares the magician to David Copperfield and Justin Timberlake.

“He has a knack for electrifying giant television and theater audiences with his unique brand of magic,” Painter said in a release.

Trent, who has appeared on “America’s Got Talent,” Ellen” and the Disney Channel, also stars in his own 10-episode TV series, “The Road Trick,” currently streaming on Netflix. The series, first launched on Red Bull TV, follows Trent through Europe where he performs magic tricks for strangers.

“So much of the magic that we are used to seeing on TV is when a magician walks up to someone on the street, does a trick that the person reacts to, and then the scene is over,” he said. “I thought, What would happen if magic wasn’t the end of the scene, but was just the beginning of the scene?”

Magic is the icebreaker. It allows him to see and experience things otherwise unavailable to him, from a yacht party in Monte Carlo to the catacombs of Paris and even a date with a supermodel in Copenhagen.

But by his own admission, he’d rather be on stage.

“I’m a conglomeration of the people who influenced me,” he said, “and David Copperfield was certainly one of those.”

Growing up in Boulder, Colo., Trent became enthralled by Copperfield and his live theater shows. He was similarly influenced by comedian Chris Rock, pop star Michael Jackson, boy band ‘N Sync and movie star Fred Astaire “because Fred Astaire was magical the way he danced,” he said.

Although he’s performed since elementary school, Trent said it wasn’t until the seventh grade when he got permission to put on a magic show for his school that he got to fuse his loves together.

He had 45 minutes to fill – and only two-and-a-half minutes of material.

“What I ended up doing was riffing with the audience: Hey, look at this guy! I did audience-participation bits, put on music and during the rope trick I danced with the rope for a minute or two,” he said. “I cut the rope and danced with it some more before putting the two ends back together again. It was the absolute most fun I’d ever had, and people responded to it.”

Infusing his magic with comedy, music and dance remains the hallmarks of Trent’s act 20 years on.

But “The Magic of Adam Trent” takes it to the next level.

“What’s really unique and special about my show is I’m able to recreate big, high-end movie special effects live on stage,” he said.

The effects include jumping into some giant LED walls – inspired by an LED effect he once saw at an ‘N Sync concert – to instantly transport to the other side of the stage, wearing a GoPro on his head, so the audience gets to see tricks from the magician’s perspective.

“My strength is in a theater performing for mass family audiences,” he said. “That’s who I am.”

The Magic of Adam Trent

When: 8 p.m. Friday, June 29 and Saturday, June 30

Where: Hollywood Pantages Theatre, 6233 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles

Tickets: $35-$135

Information: 323-468-1770. www.hollywoodpantages.com

When: 3 p.m. Sunday, July 1

Where: Segerstrom Hall at Segerstrom Center for the Arts, 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa

Tickets: $49-$99

Information:  714-556-2787. http://bit.ly/2tx1hV0

Tyler Hilinski, former Upland High grad and Washington State QB, had CTE before committing suicide, parents say

Tyler Hilinski, the late Washington State quarterback, was found to have chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the degenerative brain disease linked with football players, according to an autopsy conducted by the Mayo Clinic.

The parents of Hilinski revealed the autopsy results in a story and documentary published Tuesday morning by Sports Illustrated and later in an interview with NBC’s “Today” show.

“Did football kill Tyler? I don’t think so,” Kym Hilinski, his mother, told SI. “Did he get CTE from football? Probably. Was that the only thing that attributed to his death? I don’t know.”

Hilinski committed suicide on Jan. 16 in his apartment in Pullman, Wash. Police said the 21-year-old had shot himself in the head with a teammate’s .223 caliber rifle. Before he was found dead, teammates and coaches had grown concerned when he did not arrive for a weightlifting workout.

The former Upland High quarterback was expected to become the Cougars’ starting signal caller in the fall as a fourth-year junior.

The diagnosis showed Hilinski had Stage 1 CTE, the lowest level. Mark Hilinski, his father, told “Today,” that the medical examiner said Tyler’s brain resembled that of a 65-year-old person.

“It was a shock to get those results,” Kym added in the interview, “and find out that he had it (CTE) and to realize the sport that he loved may have contributed to that diagnosis.”

  • Approximately 1,000 people, including the entire Washington State University football team, attended a memorial service for former Upland High School graduate Tyler Hilinski on Saturday, January 27, 2018 at Damien High School in La Verne. Helinski took his own life on January 16 in Washington state. Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG

    Approximately 1,000 people, including the entire Washington State University football team, attended a memorial service for former Upland High School graduate Tyler Hilinski on Saturday, January 27, 2018 at Damien High School in La Verne. Helinski took his own life on January 16 in Washington state. Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG

  • Tyler Hilinski’s mother Kim is embraced during a memorial service for her late son Saturday in La Verne. Approximately 1,000 people, including the entire Washington State University football team, attended a memorial service for former Upland High School graduate Tyler Hilinski on Saturday, January 27, 2018 at Damien High School in La Verne. Helinski took his own life on January 16 in Washington state. Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG

    Tyler Hilinski’s mother Kim is embraced during a memorial service for her late son Saturday in La Verne. Approximately 1,000 people, including the entire Washington State University football team, attended a memorial service for former Upland High School graduate Tyler Hilinski on Saturday, January 27, 2018 at Damien High School in La Verne. Helinski took his own life on January 16 in Washington state. Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG

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  • Tyler Hilinski’s brother Ryan speaks about the former Upland High School and Washington State University quarterback during his memorial service Saturday in La Verne. Approximately 1,000 people, including the entire Washington State University football team, attended a memorial service for former Upland High School graduate Tyler Hilinski on Saturday, January 27, 2018 at Damien High School in La Verne. Helinski took his own life on January 16 in Washington state. Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG

    Tyler Hilinski’s brother Ryan speaks about the former Upland High School and Washington State University quarterback during his memorial service Saturday in La Verne. Approximately 1,000 people, including the entire Washington State University football team, attended a memorial service for former Upland High School graduate Tyler Hilinski on Saturday, January 27, 2018 at Damien High School in La Verne. Helinski took his own life on January 16 in Washington state. Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG

  • Members of the Washington State University football team leave the Damien High School gymnasium following a memorial service for teammate Tyler Hilinski on Saturday in La Verne. Approximately 1,000 people, including the entire Washington State University football team, attended a memorial service for former Upland High School graduate Tyler Hilinski on Saturday, January 27, 2018 at Damien High School in La Verne. Helinski took his own life on January 16 in Washington state. Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG

    Members of the Washington State University football team leave the Damien High School gymnasium following a memorial service for teammate Tyler Hilinski on Saturday in La Verne. Approximately 1,000 people, including the entire Washington State University football team, attended a memorial service for former Upland High School graduate Tyler Hilinski on Saturday, January 27, 2018 at Damien High School in La Verne. Helinski took his own life on January 16 in Washington state. Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG

  • Items are left at a makeshift memorial for Washington State quarterback Tyler Hilinski outside Martin Stadium in Pullman, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2018.. (Geoff Crimmins/The Moscow-Pullman Daily News via AP)

    Items are left at a makeshift memorial for Washington State quarterback Tyler Hilinski outside Martin Stadium in Pullman, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2018.. (Geoff Crimmins/The Moscow-Pullman Daily News via AP)

  • Washington State quarterback Tyler Hilinski (3) walks on the field after an NCAA college football game against Nevada in Pullman, Wash., Saturday, Sept. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Young Kwak)

    Washington State quarterback Tyler Hilinski (3) walks on the field after an NCAA college football game against Nevada in Pullman, Wash., Saturday, Sept. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Young Kwak)

  • Washington State quarterback Tyler Hilinski (3) hugs teammate wide receiver CJ Dimry after an an NCAA college football game against Boise State in Pullman, Wash., Saturday, Sept. 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Young Kwak)

    Washington State quarterback Tyler Hilinski (3) hugs teammate wide receiver CJ Dimry after an an NCAA college football game against Boise State in Pullman, Wash., Saturday, Sept. 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Young Kwak)

  • Upland High School head football coach Tim Salter attends the memorial service for former player Tyler Hilinski on Saturday in La Verne. Approximately 1,000 people, including the entire Washington State University football team, attended a memorial service for former Upland High School graduate Tyler Hilinski on Saturday, January 27, 2018 at Damien High School in La Verne. Helinski took his own life on January 16 in Washington state. Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG

    Upland High School head football coach Tim Salter attends the memorial service for former player Tyler Hilinski on Saturday in La Verne. Approximately 1,000 people, including the entire Washington State University football team, attended a memorial service for former Upland High School graduate Tyler Hilinski on Saturday, January 27, 2018 at Damien High School in La Verne. Helinski took his own life on January 16 in Washington state. Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG

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CTE can only be diagnosed post-mortem, though symptoms include cognitive problems, depression and mood swings. The parents said Tyler showed no obvious signs in the days before committing suicide.

Ryan Hilinski, the younger brother of Tyler, is a rising senior quarterback at Orange Lutheran High and currently committed to South Carolina.

In the SI documentary, Ryan said his brother’s CTE diagnosis “scared me a little bit,” but he planned to continue playing football.

“I think Tyler would want me to do the same thing,” Ryan said. “I don’t think he’d want me to stop.”

U.S. Supreme Court rightly condemns Korematsu decision in travel ban ruling

Editor’s note: Breaking views are thoughts from individual members of the editorial board on today’s headlines.

On Tuesday, United States Supreme Court ruled 5-4 in favor of the Trump administration’s ability to impose travel restrictions on people from Iran, North Korea, Syria, Libya, Yemen, Somalia and Venezuela.

In brief, the court found that federal immigration law “grants the President broad discretion to suspend the entry of aliens into the United States,” and that President Trump “lawfully exercised that discretion based on his findings—following a worldwide, multi-agency review—that entry of the covered aliens would be detrimental to the national interest.”

The majority made a point of noting that the decision deals with the powers of the president under the law, not the soundness of the travel ban itself.

“The Government has set forth a sufficient national security justification to survive rational basis review,” wrote Chief Justice Roberts for the majority. “We express no view on the soundness of the policy. We simply hold today that plaintiffs have not demonstrated a likelihood of success on the merits of their constitutional claim.”

In contrast, Justice Sonia Sotomayor, joined by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, argued “a reasonable observer would conclude that the Proclamation was motivated by anti-Muslim animus. That alone suffices to show thatplaintiffs are likely to succeed on the merits of their Establishment Clause claim.”

While I’m inclined to agree with Sotomayor and Ginsburg that Trump’s travel ban was motivated by anti-Muslim animus, the court’s ruling is what it is and it’s up to Congress to set things right. (But good luck with that, Congress has shown a stellar ability to do little right for a long time. This should be a lesson of the consequences of granting government in general and the executive branch in particular so much power.)

One positive take away from the court’s decision is the clear condemnation of the disgraceful Korematsu decision, a 1944 case which the Supreme Court ruled  that internment of Japanese Americans during World War II was constitutional.

In response to dissenters in the travel ban case invoking the Korematsu decision, the majority swept such comparisons aside, writing “whatever rhetorical advantage the dissent may see in doing so, Korematsu has nothing to do with this case.”

The majority then went on to set things right.

“The dissent’s reference to Korematsu, however, affords this Court the opportunity to make express what is already obvious: Korematsu was gravely wrong the day it was decided, has been overruled in the court of history, and—to be clear—’has no place in law under the Constitution,’” they wrote, quoting from Justice Robert Jackson’s dissent in the Korematsu case.

At the very least, the majority got that right.

It is worth mentioning that former Orange County Register publisher R.C. Hoiles was one of the few newspaper publishers in the country to oppose Japanese American internment at the time, writing in 1942 that, “Few, if any, people ever believed that evacuation of the Japanese was constitutional. It was a result of emotion and fright rather than being in harmony with the Constitution and the inherent rights that belong to all citizens.”

Sal Rodriguez is an editorial writer and columnist for the Southern California News Group. He may be reached at salrodriguez@scng.com

World Cup: France, Denmark advance after 0-0 yawner

MOSCOW — A game neither France nor Denmark needed to win produced the World Cup’s first 0-0 draw amid boos and whistles from fans on Tuesday.

A slow-paced game out of step with a vibrant tournament ensured already-qualified France won Group C and Denmark advanced as runner-up.

A draw ensured that outcome, though Peru’s 2-0 victory over Australia playing at the same time meant the Danes would have advanced to the round of 16 even had they lost to France.

A French team with six starters resting barely tested Denmark goalkeeper Kasper Schmeichel until substitute Nabil Fekir tried two long-range shots.

Much of a 78,011 crowd in Luzhniki Stadium whistled misplaced passes and slow play as the game progressed and Denmark protected its point — likely aware Australia had no chance of winning.

Grammys’ solution to diversity problem: more nominees per category

 

In reaction to the dominance of males among Grammy nominees, musician Sheryl Crow tweeted that the Recording Academy should bring back separate male and female categories. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images)
In reaction to the dominance of males among Grammy nominees, musician Sheryl Crow tweeted that the Recording Academy should bring back separate male and female categories. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images)

By MESFIN FEKADU | AP Music Writer

NEW YORK — The Grammy Awards are extending the number of nominees in its top categories from five to eight.

The Recording Academy told its members in a letter released Tuesday that the nominee increase “will better reflect the large number of entries in these categories and allow voters greater flexibility when selecting this year’s best recordings.”

Album of the year, song of the year, record of the year and best new artist are the categories that will be affected. The change comes months after the Grammys were criticized for the lack of women nominees at this year’s awards show.

For years, the organization has been called out for the lack of diversity when it comes to winners in the top four categories, where awards tend to go to acts in the pop, rock or country music genres, instead of hip-hop or R&B stars, even in years where Kanye West, Eminem and Mariah Carey were predicted to win.

Another change at the organization is with Neil Portnow, the president and CEO of The Recording Academy, who will step down next year. Portnow, who has led the academy since 2002, was criticized at this year’s Grammys when he said women need to “step up” when asked about the lack of female winners backstage. Only two female performers won awards during the live telecast.

Bruno Mars won album, song and record of the year at this year’s show, while Alessia Cara was named best new artist.

The Recording Academy and Portnow individually came in for considerable criticism from various corners following the 2018 award show in January.

Musicians including Pink and Sheryl Crow tweeted harsh reactions to the dominance of males among Grammy nominees.

Crow on Twitter argued that the Grammys should reinstate separate male and female categories. In a large restructuring and trimming of categories, the Grammys in 2011 essentially did away with divisions by gender.

“Who will young girls be inspired by to pick up a guitar and rock when most every category is filled with men?” asked Crow.

Crow is among those named to a Grammy task force on inclusion and diversity.

Voting for the 2019 Grammys will take place in the fall and will include songs and albums released between Oct. 1, 2017 and Sept. 30, 2018.

City News Service and Daily News Staff contributed to this report.

World Cup: Peru tops Australia to end on a high note

SOCHI, Russia — Already-eliminated Peru ended Australia’s hopes of advancing to the knockout round at the World Cup with a 2-0 victory on Tuesday.

The Australians had to beat Peru and hope Denmark lost to France in the other Group C match, but neither result happened. France and Denmark drew 0-0 in Moscow.

Andre Carrillo’s first-half goal — a half-volley from inside the area — was Peru’s first in a World Cup since 1982, the last time the South Americans played in the tournament.

Peru hadn’t won a World Cup match since defeating Iran in 1978.

Peru captain Paolo Guerrero, who almost missed the tournament because of a doping suspension, scored the second goal early in the second half to give his team an honorable finish after two opening losses.

Tim Cahill, a 38-year-old striker who entered the match in the second half, couldn’t give Australia a boost as it tried to reach the round of 16 for the first time since 2006.

The Mighty Mighty Bosstones celebrate the 20th anniversary of ‘Let’s Face It’ and bring new music to the Regent Theater this week

After receiving a tremendous response at the inaugural two-day Back to the Beach Festival at Huntington State Beach back in April, The Mighty Mighty Bosstones will return to the area to headline the Regent Theater in downtown Los Angeles on Friday night.

This time around, the band is celebrating the 20th anniversary of its popular fifth studio album, “Let’s Face It,” by playing the release from front to back. The band has been playing the anniversary shows around the country since mid-2017 and after West Coast fans demanded a local performance, the nine-piece ska band from Boston happily obliged.

“It’s a great tour because when the nine of us get together and we go around to places where people are excited to see us and we show up on stage and everyone is happy we’re there, it’s a lot of fun,” vocalist Dicky Barrett said during a recent phone interview as he was prepping for his duties as the announcer of the “Jimmy Kimmel Live” show, which tapes in Los Angeles. “Playing this album specifically was kind of difficult because there are songs that we never even considered playing live before and we wanted to do those justice and didn’t want them to suffer, so that was a little bit harder. But, we wanted to make it feel like you were listening to the album except that we were standing right in front of you.”

  • The Mighty Mighty Bosstones will headline the Regent Theater in downtown Los Angeles on Friday, June 29. (Photo by Lisa Johnson Rock Photographer)

    The Mighty Mighty Bosstones will headline the Regent Theater in downtown Los Angeles on Friday, June 29. (Photo by Lisa Johnson Rock Photographer)

  • The Mighty Mighty Bosstones will headline the Regent Theater in downtown Los Angeles on Friday, June 29. (Photo by Lisa Johnson Rock Photographer)

    The Mighty Mighty Bosstones will headline the Regent Theater in downtown Los Angeles on Friday, June 29. (Photo by Lisa Johnson Rock Photographer)

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  • The Mighty Mighty Bosstones will headline the Regent Theater in downtown Los Angeles on Friday, June 29. (Photo by Lisa Johnson Rock Photographer)

    The Mighty Mighty Bosstones will headline the Regent Theater in downtown Los Angeles on Friday, June 29. (Photo by Lisa Johnson Rock Photographer)

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One of the highlights of each of these shows is undoubtedly when the band cues up the fourth song on the record, its massive ’90s hit, “The Impression That I Get.”

“The thing I’m happy about with that song is that when I hear it now, it doesn’t bum me out,” Barrett said. “I don’t sit there and go ‘Oh, yeesh.’ I’m proud of it. With all due respect to the Baha Men, it’s not ‘Who Let the Dogs Out’ or a song like ‘I’m Too Sexy’ where you go ‘Eh, Gosh, why did I …? It was a different time!’ I think ‘The Impression That I Get’ holds up and it doesn’t sound bad to me now. I think it’s a good, strong song so it’s a bit of a bullet dodged because certainly writing a song like ‘Who Let the Dogs Out’ isn’t beneath me either, so that could have happened. Once again, no offense to the Baha Men.”

On top of celebrating the anniversary of “Let’s Face It,” the Bosstones also dropped their first new album in seven years, “While We’re At It,” on June 15. Though the focus of the Regent gig will be “Let’s Face It,” Barrett said the band will also play a few new songs and other fan favorites.

The latest record is the final chapter in a trilogy that includes 2009’s “Pin Points and Gin Joints” and 2011’s “The Magic of Youth,” which were, along with the newest record, produced by Ted Hutt. Barrett said when it came to writing the lyrics, he stuck with what he knew and wrote about current issues and some political and cultural topics in particular that were bothering him. As ferocious as some of the content comes across, there’s a light at the end which is something Barrett said is a common theme in the Bosstones’ discography.

“I’m far from throwing in the towel and washing my hands of everything,” he said. “As you get older, it’s tempting to do sometimes … but the truth of the matter is that there is always hope and tomorrow, or even the rest of today. Quite simply without hope, there’s no hope so if given the choice, I’ll take hope over no hope any day. It’s hard sometimes, but we don’t bury that hope in the sand because then we wouldn’t be true to ourselves. We’re not dumb guys. We might look like it and sometimes even sound like it, but we’re not. We’re not blind to what’s going on in the world today.”

Ska music is perfect for trying times like these, Barrett said, noting that a festival like Back to the Beach, which was curated by Goldfinger frontman John Feldmann and Blink-182 anchor Travis Barker, was an important one as it included a mix of ska acts from legends such as L.A’s Fishbone to the up-and-coming artists like ska punk band The Interrupters, which also hails from Los Angeles.

“They put together a really terrific event from top to bottom and I loved being a part of it,” he said. “When you look at it on paper, you’re kinda like, ‘Is that too much ska?’ But it wasn’t.”

Barrett fell in love with ska music the first time he heard Madness and he’ll argue ’til the death with anyone who doesn’t agree that The Specials are one of the greatest bands ever.

“I’m so tired people spouting off about whether ska music is important or not and I take offense to that because I’m passionate about it,” he said. “Since I first heard ska music, I was passionate about it. It has a tremendous message and it sounds great, so if anyone has a problem with that, then they should just stop listening to music all together. Go away, please. I’ll go as far as to say that is a problem with the modern world is that everybody has an opinion and now they have somewhere to give it. I miss the old days when everyone didn’t have a Facebook page, a Twitter account or an Instagram account. Some people, we’re just not supposed to hear from them.”

For the Bosstones, ska is just what happened to work its way into its sound as they were starting off as a band in the early ’80s.

“It had the energy and the intensity of punk rock, but you could dance to it and it wasn’t stupid,” he said. “It wasn’t just dumb dance music, it was people saying thoughtful things about the things they cared the most about whether it was life in the city or things they wanted to change, they had a voice and had something to say so it just made sense to us making music back in Boston.”

The Mighty Mighty Bosstones

When: 7 p.m. Friday, June 29

Where: The Regent Theater, 448 S. Main Street, Los Angeles

Tickets: $23.50 in advance or $30 day-of-show at Ticketfly.com 

Supreme Court: Anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers don’t have to provide abortion information

By MARK SHERMAN | Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court says a California law that forces anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers to provide information about abortion probably violates the Constitution.

The 5-4 ruling Tuesday also casts doubts on similar laws in Hawaii and Illinois.

The California law took effect in 2016. It requires centers that are licensed by the state to tell clients about the availability of contraception, abortion and pre-natal care, at little or no cost. Centers that are unlicensed were required to post a sign that said so. The court struck down that portion of the law.

RELATED STORY: Supreme Court upholds Trump travel ban, rejects discrimination claim

The centers said they were singled out and forced to deliver a message with which they disagreed. California said the law was needed to let poor women know all their options.

Justice Clarence Thomas said in his majority opinion said the centers “are likely to succeed” in their constitutional challenge to the law.

“California cannot co-opt the licensed facilities to deliver its message for it,” Thomas wrote for himself and his conservative colleagues, Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Anthony Kennedy, Samuel Alito and Neil Gorsuch. He called the requirement for unlicensed centers “unjustified and unduly burdensome.”

Justice Stephen Breyer said among the reasons the law should be upheld is that the high court has previously upheld state laws requiring doctors to tell women seeking abortions about adoption services. “After all, the law must be evenhanded,” Breyer said in a dissenting opinion joined by his liberal colleagues, Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan.

The abortion-rights group NARAL Pro-Choice California was a prime sponsor of the California law. NARAL contends that the centers mislead women about their options and try to pressure them to forgo abortion. Estimates of the number of crisis pregnancy centers in the U.S. run from 2,500 to more than 4,000, compared with fewer than 1,500 abortion providers, women’s rights groups said in a Supreme Court filing.

California’s law was challenged by the National Institute of Family and Life Advocates, an organization with ties to 1,500 pregnancy centers nationwide and 140 in California.

The court has previously upheld requirements that doctors in abortion clinics must tell patients about alternatives to abortion.

In another lawsuit over regulating crisis pregnancy centers, a federal appeals court in New York struck down parts of a New York City ordinance, although it upheld the requirement for unlicensed centers to say that they lack a license.

Other states have laws that regulate doctors’ speech in the abortion context. In Louisiana, Texas and Wisconsin, doctors must display a sonogram and describe the fetus to most pregnant women considering an abortion, according to the Guttmacher Institute, which supports abortion rights. Similar laws have been blocked in Kentucky, North Carolina and Oklahoma.

Doctors’ speech has also been an issue in non-abortion cases. A federal appeals court struck down parts of a 2011 Florida law that sought to prohibit doctors from talking about gun safety with their patients. Under the law, doctors faced fines and the possible loss of their medical licenses for discussing guns with patients.

L.A.-Orange County house prices up 8.3 percent in April, Case-Shiller reports

Los Angeles-Orange County house prices rose in April at the fastest pace in nearly four years, figures from the S&P Case-Shiller Home Price Index showed Tuesday, June 26.

The value of existing, single-family homes rose 8.3 percent in April, the index showed. That’s the fifth-highest appreciation rate among the 20 U.S. metro areas in the index and the highest for the region since July 2014.

By comparison, Los Angeles-Orange County house prices had an average gain of 6 percent in the previous two years.

The Case-Shiller index is the latest in at least four housing reports showing home price appreciation has surged this spring amid high buyer competition for a tight supply of homes listed for sale.

“The favorable economy and moderate mortgage rates both support recent gains in housing,” said David Blitzer, chairman of the Index Committee atS&P Dow Jones Indices. “One factor pushing prices up is the continued low supply of homes for sale.”

It would take 4.3 months to sell all the homes on the market at the current sales pace, an inventory level Blitzer called “still low.”

Prices rose 6.6 percent in the 20-city composite index, compared with an average of 5.7 percent the preceding two years.

Seattle continues to have the most rapidly rising house prices among the 20 top metro areas in the Case-Shiller report, with an April gain of 13.1 percent. Seattle has had the index’s largest gains for 20 months.

Las Vegas and San Francisco were the only other two metro areas with double-digit appreciation rates. House prices were up 12.7 percent in Las Vegas, 10.9 percent in San Francisco and 8.6 percent in Denver.

Supreme Court upholds Trump travel ban, rejects discrimination claim

By MARK SHERMAN | Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld President Donald Trump’s ban on travel from several mostly Muslim countries, rejecting a challenge that it discriminated against Muslims or exceeded his authority.

The 5-4 decision Tuesday is the court’s first substantive ruling on a Trump administration policy.

Chief Justice John Roberts wrote the majority opinion, joined by his four conservative colleagues.

Roberts wrote that presidents have substantial power to regulate immigration. He also rejected the challengers’ claim of anti-Muslim bias.

But he was careful not to endorse either Trump’s provocative statements about immigration in general and Muslims in particular.

“We express no view on the soundness of the policy,” Roberts wrote.

The travel ban has been fully in place since the court declined to block it in December. The justices allowed the policy to take full effect even as the court fight continued and lower courts had ruled it out of bounds.

Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote in a dissent that based on the evidence in the case “a reasonable observer would conclude that the Proclamation was motivated by anti-Muslim animus.” She said her colleagues arrived at the opposite result by “ignoring the facts, misconstruing our legal precedent, and turning a blind eye to the pain and suffering the Proclamation inflicts upon countless families and individuals, many of whom are United States citizens.”

Justices Stephen Breyer, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Elena Kagan also dissented.

The policy applies to travelers from five countries with overwhelmingly Muslim populations — Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen. It also affects two non-Muslim countries: blocking travelers from North Korea and some Venezuelan government officials and their families. A sixth majority Muslim country, Chad, was removed from the list in April after improving “its identity-management and information sharing practices,” Trump said in a proclamation.

The administration had pointed to the Chad decision to show that the restrictions are premised only on national security concerns.

The challengers, though, argued that the court could just ignore all that has happened, beginning with Trump’s campaign tweets to prevent the entry of Muslims into the United States. Just a week after he took office in January 2017, Trump announced his first travel ban aimed at seven countries.

That triggered chaos and protests across the U.S. as travelers were stopped from boarding international flights and detained at airports for hours. Trump tweaked the order after the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco refused to reinstate the ban.

The next version, unveiled in March 2017, dropped Iraq from the list of covered countries and made it clear the 90-day ban covering Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen didn’t apply to those travelers who already had visas. It also eliminated language that would give priority to religious minorities. Critics said the changes didn’t erase the ban’s legal problems.

The current version dates from September and it followed what the administration has called a thorough review by several federal agencies, although it has not shared the review with courts or the public.

Federal trial judges in Hawaii and Maryland had blocked the travel ban from taking effect, finding that the new version looked too much like its predecessors. Those rulings that were largely upheld by federal appeals courts in Richmond, Virginia, and San Francisco.

Roberts wrote that presidents have frequently used their power to talk to the nation “to espouse the principles of religious freedom and tolerance on which this Nation was founded.”

But he added that presidents and the country have not always lived up “to those inspiring words.”